The world in a door, nuances of Iran

nuances of iran

Different knobs on Yazd doors introduce us to the nuances of Iran’s society

It’s a tradition that belongs to a not-so-remote past, and while now it’s not in use anymore, the traces it left are still visible and epitomized in small doors, revealing the almost imperceptible nuances of Iran.

Different knobs for different guests, a heavy, sturdy and thick knob for men, the stronger gender, opposed to a lighter, more slender and dainty one for their female counterpart, the gentle gender. This way, inside everybody is aware of who’s knocking and they can better decide who’s going to open the door, what they can wear to welcome their guest and how to share the each member’s duty.

Nuances of Iran in the smaller, daily gestures.

Unconventional prelude to Iran’s private space, these pint-sized portals are the image of a world where discretion and modesty are compass.

nuances of iran

Everything makes you expect a realm made of silence, and only after guests are gingerly let in, Iranian sense of hospitality will take over and a babel of chattering, laughing and lots of food will provide you with a true sensory overload.

Clearly belonging to the generation prior to the modern doorbell intercom systems, it’s fascinating to see how the desert city of Yazd has been quickly adapting to modernity without sacrificing its more traditional way of life.

nuances of iran

Favorite stop of people, traders and ideas travelling along the legendary Silk Road, Yazd is a must-see for anyone who decides to visit Iran for the first time, or the second, third, etc., just like me, that I always like to go back in order to never miss my shopping adventures and bring home some more traditional termeh fabrics and baklava sweets.

“Keep knocking, and the joy inside will eventually open a window and look out to see who’s there.”
Rumi

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6 Comments
  1. Que c’est interessant et original!

  2. Such a beautiful and moving post. I remember the old house of my grandparents had such knobs too, and in north, wooden doors and windows were typical part of local architecture due to availability and climate. How sad, we did not keep that architecture.
    I love such old houses much more than the luxurious modern ones which hold no identity.

    • Che post strano e interessante. Anche in Sardegna ci sono bellissimi portali con battacchi molto lavorati e artistici.Ma questi portoni e finestre iraniane sono proprio insolite!

  3. I must add that this post made me miss our round Iran trip. Can’t want for more exploring! Lol

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