The symbol of Jerusalem, capital of Palestine, dominates one of the widest roads

When I travel, I always like to unearth unsung spots, and most of the times they are beautiful places that just need some tourism boost. This, unfortunately, is not the case for this post’s topic.

Every region bears within their borders injustice and the dirty remains of a not-so-remote past, and so does Lebanon, especially the southern part of this amazing, tiny country. I’ve always believed travel writing was a mission, more than just a job, and this becomes an even apter definition in West Asia, where travel writers have the opportunity to go beyond brochure-like descriptions and perform their best skills of honest reporting.

Lebanon is a small country that bears so many idiosyncrasies, both geographical and social, that it should be a real tourist-magnet. Yet, here tourism is still a struggling field. Why? Foreigners are hardly lured in because this is one of those war-stricken nations the suffering of which is still very much vivid in our memory. Twenty-two years of Israeli occupation from 1978 to 2000, combined with 33 days of merciless bombing from the same Israeli army in 2006 are way too recent to fall in the scrap heap of history.

A crossroad in the camp, the biggest road I’ve seen there

When I visited Bourj El Shamali Palestinian refugee camp near Sour (Tyre), I felt I was in the place where Palestine’s tragic history blends with Lebanese troubled past and present. The people I met in Bourj El Shamali are all descendants of the Palestinians who survived the Nakba, the ethnic cleansing carried out in 1948 by the Zionist militia in occupied Palestine, where natives were either slaughtered or expelled from their land.

Every May 5th Palestinians around the world commemorate the Nakba: next week will be its 64th anniversary, too recent a tragedy and piece of human history to be forgotten, and of which we still hold every detail.

At the end of 1947 the Tel Aviv’s Red House became headquarter of the Hagana, the main Zionist militia operating in Palestine, building where in March 1948 the Zionist leaders decided to put into practice the so-called Plan D, the ethnic cleansing of Palestine through the systematic expulsion of its natives. There are documents, there are names, plans and dates, carefully reported by Israeli historian Ilan Pappe in his well-researched “The Ethnic Cleansing of Palestine”, a book I recommend anyone to read as it highlights both the steps that brought about the expulsion and “the cognitive system that allowed the world to forget, and enabled the perpetrators to deny, the crime the Zionist movement committed against the Palestinian people in 1948”.

Palestinian flag at the entrance of UNRWA-run school

Israel expelled the natives from their land sending them to neighboring countries, Lebanon, Syria and Jordan. The mass expulsion took place as large-scale intimidation, bombarding villages and population centers, setting fire to homes, properties and goods, demolition and planting of mines to prevent any of the expelled from returning. Palestinians did try to fight back and defend their lands, but with a militia supported by the biggest powers of the time, they were obviously unsuccessful and desperate. It took Zionist leaders six months to complete the final mission they had in mind in order to impose a Jewish state in Palestine: more than half Palestinian population was uprooted (some 800,000 people), 531 villages destroyed, 11 built-up centers emptied of their inhabitants.

The main executors of the plan are all in Israel’s hall of fame: David Ben-Gurion, the undisputed leader of the Zionist movement, in whose house “all early and later chapters in the ethnic cleansing story were discussed and finalised”. Among the other executors are “Moshe Kalman, who cleansed the Safad area, and Moshe Carmel, who uprooted most of the Galilee. Yitzhak Rabin operated both in Lydd and Ramla as well as in the Greater Jerusalem area.” All men who went down in history as “heroes” of the so-called “state of Israel”.

Not-so-subtle wires show the rudimentary electric infrastructure

As soon as I walked in the camp, I realized I was motioning towards a different world, a sort of parallel dimension to the reality I’m used to. “Our youth shouldn’t waste their time dreaming about becoming doctors, lawyers, writers, they will never manage to get an authorization to practice their activity, they will never be able to migrate abroad, they are not allowed in Lebanon and they are prevented from returning to their homeland”, told me Mahmoud Jouma’a, manager and administrator of NGO Beit Atfal Assumoud and pivotal figure in the camp itself.

I knew all this, but listening first-hand to the hard truth acquired a whole new shape. My “free” spirit now looked like a “spoilt-child-like” spirit. I stared at him speechless, observing his polite and calm manners, and finding deeply unfair what he had to say, yet the real reason why I couldn’t come up with any argument for debate was that I knew he was right. How could I dare suggesting to fight for their rights to have a better education when they are still fighting for their right to exist? Who better than him knows the situation Palestinian refugees face every single day?

What I do find utterly frustrating is that many people blindly accept the fact that Israel’s right to exist translates into Palestinian non-right to do the same. They have no right to have a life because they were expelled from their own hometown, prevented from returning, uprooted from their own society and widely ignored by the rest of the world.

Kids playing in their backyard

The narrow alleys of Bourj El Shamali camp barely allow a motorbike per time, while cars fit only in the largest streets. The whole camp, housing some 19,000 refugees, looks like a huge neighborhood, more than a proper town. It was set up in 1948 to provide the Palestinian refugees from northern Palestinian regions of Hawla and Tiberias with a shelter. The main occupation among the camp’s inhabitants is in agriculture, mostly seasonal work at low daily wages. Poverty is widespread, infrastructure is near to non-existent, the drinking water and sewage system are yet to be settled by the UNRWA, in charge of the basics for the refugees, low availability of construction materials results in grim living and health conditions, and unemployment rates reach 65% for men and 90% for women. UNRWA runs two schools, but the absence of any kind of facility and resource makes it impossible for children and teenagers to reach a basic educational level in order to be accepted by any university, should the government allow this.

It took me a bit, but at the end I realized this was a place where dreaming is not allowed in.

Hiba (left), worker of Beit Atfal Assumoud, and Leila (right), my friend, volunteering for the NGO.

Beit Atfal Assumoud NGO tries its best to make life easier for the Palestinians who, after more than 60 years, generation after generation, still are refugees. Medical care, social activities aimed at keeping kids and teenagers off the street, counselling and family therapy, special programs to help children with learning problems are only some of the duties Beit Atfal Assumoud’s staff takes on. Waiting for donations for their medical equipments and volunteers to help them, the NGO’s workers are mainly Palestinians from the same Bourj El Shamali camp.

On my stroll around its maze of narrow streets I was guarded by three young men “because you never know what can happen”. I carefully observed life passing by before my eyes, trying to absorbe as much as I could of this unknown, disquieting reality we only slightly hear of in Europe, never accurately enough to make us aware of the actual Palestinian daily struggle. Crumbling buildings, small shops, rudimentary bakeries from which their delicious traditional bread manakeesh released a homely smell of homemade food, kids playing and sobbing babies clinging onto their mothers’ neck, still unaware of their past and their future, was the scenery that unfolded as I went past. Those babies will be unaware still for a short moment, just about when their understanding faculties will permanently imbue their minds, because they will soon learn the hard way what they can and they cannot yearn for, and they will soon learn from their parents and grandparents’ passionate tales about the tragic history of their people, the calamity that fell upon them and their homeland. That’s right, even the kids know the name of their native village, the original name that the foreign occupiers have changed in a desperate attempt to erase Palestinian identity from earth, efforts that from 1948 up to now have been widely unsuccessful.

These are my three fierce guards, the boys of the NGO who showed me around the camp

When I think of the absurdity of Palestinians’ situation today, of how unaware, and very much in denial, most of us are in Europe with respect to the plight of what a three-hour flight from Rome makes it a neighboring country, Malcolm X inevitably comes to my mind with his powerful quote: “If you’re not careful, the newspapers will have you hating the people who are being oppressed, and loving the people who are doing the oppressing.”

 

*I’ve taken many pictures around the camp, you can find them all on the Flickr set I devoted to Bourj El Shamali.

44 Comments

  • Sarah Irving says:

    ““Our youth shouldn’t waste their time dreaming about becoming doctors, lawyers, writers, they will never manage to get an authorization to practice their activity, they will never be able to migrate abroad, they are not allowed in Lebanon and they are prevented from returning to their homeland”, told me Mahmoud Jouma’a, manager and administrator of NGO Beit Atfal Assumoud and pivotal figure in the camp itself… I knew all this, but listening first-hand to the hard truth acquired a whole new shape. My “free” spirit now looked like a “spoilt-child-like” spirit. I stared at him speechless, observing his polite and calm manners, and finding deeply unfair what he had to say, yet the real reason why I couldn’t come up with any argument for debate was that I knew he was right. How could I dare suggesting to fight for their rights to have a better education when they are still fighting for their right to exist?”
    A very brave, true and honest thing to write. I hope many more people find this article and get a taste of this reality.

  • “If you’re not careful, the newspapers will have you hating the people who are being oppressed, and loving the people who are doing the oppressing.” This is so true! A perfect quote for the Palestinian/Israeli situation! Why does the world ignore the Palestinians?
    Thank you so much for sharing your experience in the Bourj al Shamali camp (and your whole series on Lebanon). It is mind boggling to think that the world continues to ignore the conditions and plight of the Palestinian people. My family will be traveling to Lebanon this summer and my daughter hopes to volunteer to work in one of the refugee camps. She currently co-organizes a Students for Justice in Palestine group at Wesleyan University in Connecticut. I’ve just sent her your blog; I’m sure she will contact you as well. Good luck with your work and your travels.

    • Hi Gina, thanks for stopping by. By all means pass my blog to your daughter, she can contact me if she needs any info and contacts in Lebanon. What she’s doing is great, volunteers are very much needed in Palestinian camps, and raising awareness on the topic is very important.

  • Marie says:

    C’est bien que tu fasses savoir comment sont REELLEMENT les choses!Il y a trop d’ignorance sul la matière!

  • Domenico says:

    Quanti pregiudizi si hanno e si conservano leggendo la stampa “ufficiale e allineata”!!!???

  • Wow – extremely thought provoking. Lebanon is almost like another world – but it’s still beautiful, intriguing and interesting.

  • The wonderful thing when we could visit anywhere in the world with peace.

  • Fly Girl says:

    This writing was so evocative and so unyielding that I am crying, Angela. You have done a wonderful job of translating the pain and injustice that Palenstinians are handed without preaching or moralizing. This is such an exceptional post, you really should have it published in a magazine.

    • Thanks so much for your kind words, Rosalind. I’ve always been very close to the Palestinian issue as I really think it’s one of the biggest absurdities of our times, so visiting one of the refugee camps, at last, was very emotional for me and helped me have a bigger picture.

  • ava apollo says:

    Wow, still, after 60 years. I’m shocked. This is also one of those times when I feel a twinge of guilt for being American, because I know the powers that be in this country probably didn’t help this situation. What a post! It’s the first one I’ve read of yours, and I’m blown away. Talk about intrepid travel!

    • Thanks Ava, I’m blushing ;)

      You’re right, if more world powers had a stronger position to protect unarmed Palestinian civilians, now their situation would be much different.

  • Kala says:

    Terrible. The US should be ashamed of its blind support of all things Israeli.

    • I agree, Kala, and Europe should be ashamed too. Although, you know, I don’t think our politicians are so willing to support Israeli policies, sometimes it looks like they have no other choice. Which they have, I’m sure about it.

  • zahra dn says:

    hellooooooooo. Excellent … You’re a skilled photographer and writer :P

  • Thank you for sharing this.

  • Wow, definitely gives one something else to consider this May 5th other than Cinco de Mayo. Thanks for sharing this. Your perspective is very important and appreciated.

  • Abby says:

    I could read your writing all day… It is so honest and relatable — not an easy task, given the content.

  • Thank you so much for this post. I feel really annoyed about the state of things with Isreal…. Isreal is blatently breaking UN law by going outside of their UN determined borders… and yet no one does anything about it! It is so frustrating!

    • Thanks for your comment, Jade. I think many people are annoyed by Israel’s policies, which more than policies are crimes against humanity and a blatant violation of the very basic human rights, but they still control mainstream media and politicians, this is why our governments still support them.

  • Laurel says:

    Love the MalcolmX quote,even though it’s so chilling. And I think you’re right that most people in Europe don’t think about the Palestinian’s or do as much as we could be doing to help.

  • Shivya says:

    Such a hard hitting story, Angela. I admire you for travelling beyond tourism indeed, into world whose reality we know very little about. This is a very powerful story. Thank you for sharing it.

    • It’s a real humanitarian emergency, but seems like this never-ending, well-orchestrated economic crisis has made everybody forget how to help each other. Thanks for taking the time to read :)

  • Turtle says:

    Great piece. This is exactly why people should travel – to see the parts of the world that their governments have such an effect on. If you can’t understand these things, how can you elect the people who make the decisions about it!
    Oh, and I love the line “It took me a bit, but at the end I realized this was a place where dreaming is not allowed in.” It really makes you stop and think about how lucky we are.

  • Thank you for sharing such an important post.

  • NH says:

    Dear Angela,
    I stopped by your website while in the process of searching for NGOs working with the Palestinian Refugees in Lebanon, such a great topic and great courage. Most people try to deny such basic facts because it makes life easier. But to see someone as interested as you are is a blessing.
    I share the same passion, and stemming from that passion I decided to study the situation of the Palestinian refugees in Lebanon among other countries, and will be going there for fieldwork very soon. I was wondering if you can and are willing to help me with contacts like Hiba, Leila and anyone who was able and willing to show you around the camps.

    Any help will be very much appreciated and in case help is not possible, no worries :) I can understand.

    Best Regards

    P.S you can contact me on my e-mail address supplied while writing this comment.

    • Dear Nadine, thanks for your comment, what you do it’s very important and I’m glad you found my post useful. I’ll put you directly in contact with Leila via email.

  • Thomas Tsoi says:

    Hi Angela! I love your blog as I myself am also very interested in visiting less obvious destinations and dig deeper into local cultures.
    Incidentally, I’m going to visit Lebanon next month too and I am very interested in paying a trip to one of these Palestinian refugee camps there.
    Having read your post allows me to understanding the situation there more, but I’m still concerned about personal safety as it seems that you (or your NGO friends) didn’t find it very safe for a foreigner to wander around. Specifically I’m Chinese and I reckon that will attract a lot of attention.
    I’ve been to some other regions of conflicts such as Karabakh and the tribal regions in Bangladesh, therefore I guess I’m not totally inexperienced. But it will be really useful to learn more about the actual situation there. So if you could give some advice on this particular point I’ll be much grateful!! Thanks!

    • Hi Thomas, thanks a lot for your comment. Lebanon in general is quite safe, probably not easy to travel around as there’s no much public transport, but if you travel slowly, it will be ok ;)
      If you wish I can put you in contact with my friend working at the camp so you can enter with her NGO and someone will show you around?

  • Amira says:

    Hi! I also spent some time in Lebanon in 2006 just before war broke out between Hezballah and the Israeli army. I stayed 3 months with a Palestinian family in Beirut (Rouche area) but I spent a lot of time at the Sabra refugee camp. Out of all of the places to visit and things to do in Lebanon, Sabra was my favorite place. The people were so warm and friendly and completely wonderful.

    Do you have any experience traveling to the Palestinian refugee camps in Palestinian Occupied Territories within “Israel” ? I’m interested in doing a summer volunteer program there.

    Thank you for your blog and sharing your experiences. God bless you for your help and commitment to the cause.
    Amira

    • Hi Amira, thanks for your comment. I’ve never been anywhere in Palestine, I think this would be a truly emotional experience. Pleaase do let me know if you manage to do your volunteer program there and how it goes, it’s something I would love to do, too.

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